Hi I’m Katie and I am addicted to stationery


PaperJunkie sell beautiful, unique journals in their Etsy store, click on the picture for a link

Does your heart beat a bit faster when you enter a stationery store? Are you filled with the hope when beginning a new notebook? Is there always some form of paper and writing implement in your bag? If you answered yes to these questions, you are not alone…

At any given moment there will between 3-7 brand new notebooks in my desk drawer. I have about 70 filled notebooks, having kept a journal since I was about 7. When I saw a post on Freshly Pressedwith a similar title to this post my boyfriend’s first words were “I bet you have way more notebooks”. The comments showed that I was not alone in my weird obsession with stationery. Other people are filled with excitement when they enter Paperchase and have spent more than they should admit on a notebook. This knowledge has only encouraged me so when I needed a new diary this month you can imagine the perils of my Internet shopping- Filofax or Moleskine? A pocket size would take up much less room in my handbag but where would I keep flyers, letters, invitations? I have managed to customise my own perfect (or so I hope) organisational system while Paul is content to simply use his iPhone (an idea that fills me with horror). I am safe in the truth that I can attribute this weird fascination to a writer’s trait, and maybe someday someone will publish my journals and people will love to read them,

Da Vinci kept journals on a variety of different subjects

just like Da Vinci. Or perhaps there will be some national emergency which only my meticulously organised diary can save… I think that latter is more likely. But for now we will no longer hide, stationary lovers will stand side by side shamelessly and we will freely check paper quality and circle around a store several times until we decide on which overpriced notebook to buy. Do not be afraid my comrades. Vive la revolution!

What are your favourite notebooks? What do you use them for?

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The prophecies of the analogue world


If you know me personally, then you know how ridiculously generous my boyfriend is. This year we agreed on a maximum amount to spend on Valentine and anniversary presents. For quite a few weeks now I have been drooling over a camera, a Diana F+ with flash by Lomography. I wasn’t casually mentioning this to Paul as a hint. As usual, he cheated and bought me the camera I wanted, even though it cost more than we had agreed. If you haven’t heard of Lomography you are in for a treat.

The Lomography society is all about the snapshot. They produce cheap, almost entirely plastic cameras, made to be taken everywhere by their snap happy owner. The point is to capture that exact moment and turn it into brightly coloured, moving art. The model I have is based on a camera from the sixties, now improved and re-produced. It is really weird going back to film, it completely changes taking photos. Unlike with my digital camera, I don’t take a million pictures per event but only take one or two and I have to rely on skill. I can’t just keep taking photos and get the camera to auto-focus, I have to do most of the work myself, even deciding on the shutter speed. This leaves so much room for experimentation. And, best of all, the subject cannot request seeing the photo, and then keep asking for re-takes until a perfect one comes along. I haven’t finished my film yet, I’m a bit nervous, I hope it doesn’t come back from the processors as blank. The excitement of collecting photos from the processor is back!

Anyway, the Lomography society is now producing a new campaign- The Ten Prophecies of Analogue. I’ve listed a shortened version below. Even if you don’t like taking photos, take the principles to heart and let them change how you see the world. I was having coffee with a new friend today, a lady who has the same illness as me. We talked about the burden, the frustration, the pain, but we also talked about the way this illness has changed us. We are different people than before our lives were smashed apart, but we are not worse people. We have to take pleasure in the simple things, and take life in the slow line. Our lives are not, and cannot, be high-pressured, running from one task to the next in a caffeine fueled mission. And this is not necessarily a bad thing.

Today, well maybe tomorrow because its late, stop and take time to smell the roses, enjoy life- definitely don’t sit on your laptop all day. The digital world is a great thing, I found my new friend on Twitter, but use it to share all the things you enjoy about life, don’t let it be your life. Don’t be a slave to the beeper, to your smart phone, to your Facebook status, and for goodness sake, do not post your every move on Twitter. Instead of tweeting every inch of your train ride, look out of the window and at the people inside your carriage. And then, by all means, like me, come and report back, use social sites to be social, read blogs, but also remember to talk to people, to see people, to touch, to feel, to smell. But read the ten prophecies below first. If you want to apply these ideas to photography, you don’t have to buy a Lomography camera, although they are pretty great, you can pull out your old camera which takes film or buy a disposable one. The full version of these prophecies is on the Lomography website, click on the link.

If you have been inspired to be apart of the Lomography revolution then a great place to start is the Sampler camera. And, believe it or not, there are actually still places processing film.

THE 10 PROPHECIES OF ANALOGUE:

1. Leave the digital grind behind

2. The return of luck, coincidence, contingency, chance, fortune and surprise

3. Expect the unexpected and the excitement of experiment

Trial and error is your policy. Action and reaction your strategy. Believe in yourself, never stop looking, never stop asking and never stop recording.

4. Lomography will bring back overtones, nuances, smells, shades, dirt and dust and real life beauty to us

Great art is not imitation but interpretation of the world.

5. Film and paper ensure originality, authenticity, and eternity

6. Look twice

Pictures that don’t grab your attention today might do tomorrow, the day after or in your next life. Rediscovering means rein-venting your: taste, style, habits and general understanding of the world. A true revolution. Look twice to find real beauty.

7. Let loose with Lomography

You are a boat, the world is an ocean and you are floating along wherever it might take you with the wind in your sails. Nothing else matters; you’re alright as long as you’re with your Lomo.

8. The avant-garde is analogue

Through the challenge of the new, the old re-invents itself and breaks free from all conventions. It finds styles, relations and languages that remain undiscovered within the mainstream. Therefore analogue is the most exciting form of expression nowadays; the avant-garde of the 21st century.

9. A bazillion fresh tunes await us

10. The analogue future is the home of a whole lot of love, joy, fun, sex and… paradise!

Disclaimer: I did not take any of the photos featured in this post. I got them from Google images, have a look, there are tons more.

Judy’s Affordable Vintage Fair


On Sunday, Judy’s Affordable Vintage Fair came to my Student’s Union. I was really, really excited about this so I took a lot of my student loan out of the cash-point and arrived at opening time. I had a strategic plan, quick look around the whole fair, picking out cheap items or things which I would be gutted if I didn’t get, and then back around once more when I had decided on my items. I meant to take pictures of the fair, but I went into a shopper’s frenzy as soon as I left my flat. Poor Paulie (my boyfriend) was dragged around the fair several times for almost two hours, and bless him, he did not moan.

I like to divide my shopping into categories, part of my desire to organize everything. So firstly, here is one item I picked up on the first round of looking around the fair. I was trying my hardest not to spend an absolute fortune, so it was a toss up between cigarette case and a reel of old ticket stubs. My instinct was that it would be more difficult to find the ticket stubs so that’s what I went with.

I also picked up a lot of £1 and 50p items which I intend to turn into other things. You’ll probably be seeing these things sometime soon in Home-made.

But my bargain of the day was this vintage real leather clutch purse. I could not have put it back down on the table when the stall owner told me I could have it for £3.

I have saved the best ’til last. This was my most expensive item, a new hand-made handbag. I bought this from Fennella for £15. Fenella sells lots of different handbags, each unique and at very affordable prices. It took me a long while to decide which one to get. This is exactly the sort of hand-made items I like, taking used clothes, curtains, rugs, belts, pretty much anything used, and then make them into something completely new. The strap is a leather belt, the main bag is made from an old tapestry-type curtain, the front red part is leather cut from something else, probably clothes, and then vintage pictures, text, sketches, magazine cuttings, etc covered in varnish and then sewn on as embellishments. Even the lining has been made from material salvaged from something else. I imagine part of the reason why Fennella can sell bags at cheap prices is because all the whole product is made from recycled/reused items. I have been meaning for so long to get to grips with learning how to use a sewing machine so I can do projects using the same idea as Fennella, but, for the meantime, I will settle for buying instead of making.

And even with buying all of that, there were so many items that I exercised restraint, and did not buy. There is one stall where lots of old “junk” is turned in to charms and pendants. You pick out whatever you want from the boxes, pick out a vintage chain,  and then the jeweler at the stand and the buyer discuss and design exactly how and what you want the “junk” to be made into. There was also a lot more jewelery that I really wanted to get, an absolute abundance, and loads of clothes too. And then, like my ticket stub, there are vintage items that are incredibly hard to find like glasses, french magazines, even flying goggles, and Judy does not lie, the whole fair was very affordable.

Judy’s Affordable Vintage Fair travels- so far they have been to 22 cities and 6 major festivals in the UK. On the website you can find out when the fair is next coming to a city near you or sign up to their email list so you have a reminder.